Sources of Japanese Tradition: Volume 2, 1600 to 2000

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Columbia University Press, 19 thg 6, 2005 - 1448 trang

Now greatly expanded to include the entire twentieth century, and beginning in 1600, Sources of Japanese Tradition presents writings by modern Japan's most important philosophers, religious figures, writers, and political leaders. The volume offers extensive introductory essays and commentary to assist in understanding the documents' historical settings and significance. This expanded edition has revised many of the texts from the original edition and added a great many not included or translated before. New additions include documents on the postwar era, the importance of education in the process of modernization, and women's issues.

 

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The Tokugawa Peace
1
Ieyasu and the Founding of the Tokugawa Shogunate
7
Account of Tokugawa
20
Confucianism in the Early Tokugawa Period
29
Letter to the Korean Scholar Kang Hang
36
Teachings of Zhu Xi Brought to Japan
42
The Investigation of Things
50
The Later History of the Hayashi Family School
68
Newspaper Accounts of Arrests Under the Peace Preservation Law
744
Education in Meiji Japan Richard Rubinger
750
Views in the Early Meiji Period
757
Preamble to the Fundamental Code of Education
765
Mori Arinori and the Later Meiji School System
775
Teachers and Reform from Below
782
Nationalism and PanAsianism
789
From Article 3 of the Meiji Constitution
795

Principles of Human Nature in Vernacular Japanese
76
The Spread ofNeoConfucianism in Japan
83
Treatise on the Concept of the Middle Kingdom
92
Mary Evelyn Tucker
105
The Oyomei Wang Yangming School in Japan Barry Steben
114
The Divine Light in the Mind
121
The Relevance of Ritual to Modern Times
131
Nakae Tojus Successors in the Oyomei School Barry Steben
137
Japans First Encounter with the West
143
A Jesuit Priests Observations of Women
162
Wm Theodore de Bary and John A Tucker
185
Ito Jinsais School of Ancient Meanings John A Tucker
205
Distortion of the Way Through Ignorance of the Past
228
Varieties of NeoConfucian Education
249
The Shizutani School Mary Evelyn Tucker
268
Popular Instruction
294
The House Codes of Tokugawa Merchant Families
307
The Japanese Family Storehouse
315
The General Sense of the Extended Meaning of the Six Precepts
321
Haiku and the Democracy of Poetry as a Popular
344
Dutch Learning Grant Goodman
361
EighteenthCentury Rationalism
390
Discourses After Emerging from Meditation
415
Kaiho Seiryo and the Laws of Economics
432
John A Tucker and Barry Steben
438
Muro Kyuso
445
Essay on the Fortysix Samurai ofAko Domain
459
The National Learning Schools Peter Nosco
481
Poetry and mono no aware
505
Ancient Japanese Ethics
513
Buddhism in the Tokugawa Period
520
Opening of the Sermons
532
Orthodoxy Protest and Local Reform
548
Attentiveness to Ones Intentions
554
Agrarian Reform and Cooperative Planning
566
The Practice of Repayment
570
Unofficial History ofJapan
577
Ambitions for Japan
594
Essays on Creation and Cultivation
612
Revere the Emperor Repel the Barbarian
618
Eastern Ethics and Western Science
628
Selfishness and Heroism
656
Japan Asia and the West
665
Kido Takayoshis Observations of Education in the United States
678
A Poem by the Meiji Emperor on the Eve of the RussoJapanese War
693
On Marriage
710
China Should Not Be Despised
717
Editorial from Choya shinbun
726
Advocate of Freedom and Peoples Rights
802
Aesthetic PanAsianism Aida Yuan Wong
811
The High Tide ofPrewar Liberalism
821
Lectures on the Constitution
828
Methods by Which It Can Be Perfected
838
Is to Allow Absolute Freedom of Speech
869
The Formation ofa Liberal
878
Socialism and the Left Andrew Barshay
890
Kotoku Shusui
896
Socialism and the Left
904
Kaneko Fumiko
915
The Debate About Japanese Capitalism
921
The Essence of Capital
930
Farewell Before Daybreak
937
The Rise of Revolutionary Nationalism Marius Jansen
948
Call for a New Restoration
955
Empire and War Peter Duus
980
Concerning the New National Structure
996
Imperial Rescript on Surrender
1016
Initial Official Policies American and Japanese
1023
Introducing a New Civil Code
1036
Treaty of Peace Between the Allied Powers and Japan
1068
Democracy and High Growth Andrew Gordon
1082
A Critical View of the Postwar Constitution
1088
Two Views of the Security Treaty Crisis of 1960
1094
Yoshimoto Takaaki
1097
Minamata Disease
1105
The Japanese Middle Class at the End of the Twentieth Century
1111
The New Religions Helen Hardacre
1117
The Divine Directions
1136
Reiyukai kyodan
1147
MakiguchiTsunesaburo
1156
Japan and the World in Cultural Debate
1162
The Problem ofJapanese Culture
1172
Mishima Yukio Donald Keene
1178
Matsui Yayori and Asian Migrant Women in Japan
1209
Saito Chiyo and Japanese Feminism
1219
A Short History of Japanese Civilization
1228
Noro Eitaro
1244
A HighSchool History Textbook
1255
Japanese History in Comparison
1267
The AsiaPacific War in History and Memory
1278
Ishizaka Kei
1297
Deconstructing Japan
1303
Bibliography
1309
Index
1331
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Giới thiệu về tác giả (2005)

Wm. Theodore de Bary is John Mitchell Mason Professor Emeritus and Provost Emeritus of Columbia University and currently holds the title of Special Service Professor. He has written extensively on Confucianism in East Asia, and was general editor of the first editions of Sources of Chinese Tradition, Sources of Indian Tradition, Sources of Japanese Tradition, and Sources of Korean Tradition.

Carol Gluck is the George Sansom Professor of History at Columbia University. She is the author of Japan's Modern Myths: Ideology in the Late Meiji Period and the coeditor of Asia in Western and World History and Showa: The Japan of Hirohito.

Arthur E. Tiedemann is a member of the Society of Senior Scholars at the Heyman Center for the Humanities, Columbia University. He is the author of Modern Japan: A Brief History and Introduction to Japanese Civilization.


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