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Coalbrookdale. At the General Election of 1865 Mr. Whitmore was beaten by Sir John D. Acton by one vote, but on petition Sir John was unseated and Mr. Whitmore regained the seat, which he otherwise held uninterruptedly from 1852-1870. Mr. Whitmore was twice appointed a Lord of the Treasury in the Administrations of Lord Derby and Mr. Disraeli, and for some time acted as Conservative Whip. He was Keeper of the Privy Seal to the Prince of Wales 1858-9. Mr. Whitmore died in London on the 2nd May, 1876, and was buried in the family vault at Stockton. His constituents at Bridgnorth erected a memorial to him there.

(173) JOHN PRITCHARD (1853-69), of Stanmore Hall, Bridgnorth, was born in 1796, and was admitted to Shrewsbury School in 1810. He went late in life to the Bar, and was called at Lincoln's Inn in 1841. Mr. Pritchard was the senior partner in the well-known Shropshire banking firm of Pritchard, Nicholas, Gordon and Co. He died on the 19th August, 1891, in his 95th year, and was buried at Broseley.

(174) SIR JOHN EMERICH EDWARD DALBERG ACTON (1865), who as a Liberal beat Mr. Henry Whitmore by one vote, but was afterwards unseated on a scrutiny, was born at Naples on January 10th, 1834, being son of Sir Ferdinand Acton, of Aldenham. Being as a Roman Catholic refused admission at Cambridge, he studied at Munich with Dr. Dollinger. Having travelled widely, Sir John turned his attention to literary pursuits, and not only edited various periodicals, but wrote much himself. He sat for Carlow in the 1859 Parliament, and in 1869 a well-merited peerage as Lord Acton was bestowed on him by Mr. Gladstone, who was a life-long friend. From 1892 to 1895 Lord Acton was a Lord in Waiting to Queen Victoria, and enjoyed a large share of her confidence. At the Diamond Jubilee of 1897 Lord Acton was made a K.C.V.O., having in 1895 been appointed by Lord Rosebery as Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Cambridge, which many

years before had refused him admission as a student. His libraries, especially that at Aldenham, which had no equal amongst private libraries, were known everywhere, and it is said that his Lordship was one of the most learned men of his time. He was a Fellow of All Souls', D.C.L. Oxford, and L.L.D. Cambridge, besides having various foreign degrees. Lord Acton, who married the daughter of Count Arco Valley, died at Tegernsee, Bavaria, in June, 1902, being succeeded by his son the present Lord Acton.

(175) WILLIAM HENRY FOSTER (1870-85), the last M.P. for the old Bridgnorth Borough, and the only surviving Member, is the son of William Orme Foster, of Apley Park, and was born on the 9th April, 1846. He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford, in 1864, and is a Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for the County. Mr. Foster, who was High Sheriff of Shropshire in 1903, has been and is a great friend of, and benefactor, to Bridgnorth.

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BURWARTON.

TRANSCRIBED FROM THE BLAKEWAY M.S.S. IN THE BODLEIAN LIBRARY (VOL. X., FOL. 227) WITH NOTES AND ADDITIONS

BY THE

Rev. R. C. PURTON, M.A., and R. R. JAMES, F.R.C.S.

I conceive this Manor to derive its name from the first Saxon settler, Burrard.1 A Saxon named Azar held it in the Confessor's time. It is written Burerton in Domesday. It was then holden by Ralf de Mortemer under Earl Roger; but the immediate occupier was Helgot, lord of Castle Holgate on the other side of the hill. It was rated to the Danegeld at half a hide; but there were three carucates of land, one of which was occupied under Helgot by two villans.

2

[A space here in the M.S.-ED.]3

I do not find any further mention of this Manor till the Testa de Nevill, when Thomas de Costentin is found to hold the third part of a Knight's fee in Burwarton of the Barony of R. de Mortuo Mari.

Alan de Burerton is a frequent witness to deeds at Hadnall about this time, but I do not perceive that he had any property in this place whence he derived his name. It appears to have descended through the same hands as Eton

1 F. Edmunds in his " Names of Places" (p. 146) derives Burwarton from barw a grove; but Blakeway is probably right, though the "s" does not usually drop out. The name Burhweard is found in Burwardesley (Broseley). One may perhaps hazard the suggestion Burh-weort-tun, i.e. Warton on hill.

2 Not "carucates of land" but "plough-teams." The Domesday entry runs: The same Ralf holds Burertone and Helgot (holds) of him.' Azor held it. Half a hide is there. There is land for iii ploughs. ii villans there have i plough. It was waste, now it is worth ii shillings.”

Eyton's Antiquities,"

The authority for the early period is of course vol. III, p. 31. Helgot's holding passed to the family of De Girros. The sister of Robert de Girros was wife of Thomas de Costentine, whose son Thomas was lord of Burwarton in 1255. His daughter and heir, Isabella, became the second wife of Adam de Montgomery.

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