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Upon their woes,+ whom fortune captivates? But that thy face is, vifor-like, unchanging, Made impudent with ufe of evil deeds,

I would affay, proud queen, to make thee blush:
To tell thee whence thou cam'ft, of whom deriv'd,
Were fhame enough to fhame thee, wert thou not
fhameless.

Thy father bears the type 5 of king of Naples,
Of both the Sicils, and Jerufalem

Yet not fo wealthy as an English yeoman.

Hath that poor monarch taught thee to infult?
It needs not, nor it boots thee not, proud queen;
Unless the adage must be verified,

That beggars, mounted, run their horfe to death.
"Tis beauty, that doth oft make women proud;
But, God he knows, thy fhare thereof is fmall:
'Tis virtue, that doth make them moft admir'd;
The contrary doth make thee wonder'd at :
'Tis government, that makes them feem divine;"
The want thereof makes thee abominable:
Thou art as oppofite to every good,

As the Antipodes are unto us,

Or as the fouth to the feptentrion."

4 Upon their woes,] So, the folio. The quarto reads-Upon STEEVENS.

his woes.

5the type-] i. e. the diftinguishing mark; an obfolete ufe of the word. So again, in King Richard III:

"The high imperial type of this earth's glory."

STEEVENS.

• 'Tis government, that makes them feem divine;] Government, in the language of that time, fignified evenness of temper, and decency of manners. JOHNSON.

So, in King Henry IV. P. I. Falstaff says:

"Let men fay, we be men of good government."

STEEVENS.

7feptentrion.] i. e. the North. Septentrio, Lat. Milton

ufes the fame word as an adjective:

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cold feptentrion blasts."

STEEVENS,

O, tiger's heart, wrapp'd in a woman's hide !8 How could'st thou drain the life-blood of the child, To bid the father wipe his eyes withal,

And yet be seen to bear a woman's face? Women are soft, mild, pitiful, and flexible; 'Thou ftern, obdurate, flinty, rough, remorseless. 'Bid'ft thou me rage? why, now thou haft thy with :9

'Would'st have me weep? why, now thou haft thy will:

For raging wind blows up inceffant showers,' And, when the rage allays, the rain begins.2 These tears are my fweet Rutland's obfequies;

8 O, tiger's heart, wrapp'd in a woman's hide!] We find almoft the fame line in Acolaftus his Afterwitte, 1600:

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"O woolvish heart, wrapp'd in a woman's hide!"

:

MALONE.

thy with &c.] So the folio: The quarto reads thy will in the first line, and thy wish in the second.

STEEVENS. For raging wind blows up inceffant Showers,] Thus the folio. The quartos read—

For raging winds blow up a ftorm of tears. STEEvens. Would't have me weep? why, now thou haft thy will: For raging wind blows up inceffant fhowers,

And, when the rage allays, the rain begins.] We meet with the fame thought in our author's Rape of Lucrece :

"This windy tempeft, till it blows up rain,

"Held back his forrow's tide, to make it more;
"At last it rains, and bufy winds give o'er.
"Then fon and father weep with equal ftrife,

"Who fhould weep most for daughter or for wife."

Again, in Macbeth :

66

that tears fhall drown the wind."

Again, in Troilus and Creffida:

"Where are my tears? rain, rain, to lay this wind ?" Again, in King John:

"This fhower, blown up by tempeft of the foul-."

MALONE.

• And every drop cries vengeance for his death,3'Gainft thee, fell Clifford,—and thee falfe French

woman.

NORTH. Befhrew me, but his paffions move me fo, That hardly can I check my eyes from tears.

YORK. That face of his the hungry cannibals Would not have touch'd, would not have ftain'd with blood :4.

But you are more inhuman, more inexorable,—

3 And every drop cries vengeance for his death,] So the folio. The quarto thus:

And every drop begs vengeance as it falls,

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would not have ftain'd with blood:] Thus the firft folio.

STEEVENS.

would not have ftain'd the roses juft with blood :] So the fecond folio nonfenfically reads the paffage; but the old quarto, &c. of better authority, have it thus:

That face of his the hungry cannibals

Would not have touch'd, would not have ftain'd with blood. And this is fenfe. Could any one now have believed that an editor of common understanding should reject this, and fasten upon the nonsense of the later edition, only because it afforded matter of conjecture? and yet Mr. Theobald will needs correct, rofes juft with blood, to roses juic'd with blood, that is, change one. blundering editor's nonfenfe for another's. But if there ever was any meaning in the line, it was thus expreffed:

Would not have ftain'd the rofes just in bud.
And this the Oxford editor hath efpoufed. WARBURTON.

As, without correction, the words—the roses juft, do not make good sense, there is very little reason to suspect their being interpolated, and therefore it is most probable they were preserved among the players by memory. The correction is this:

That face of his the hungry cannibals

Would not have touch'd:

Would not have ftain'd the roses just i' th' bloom. The words [the roses juft] were, I fuppofe, left out by the first editors, in order to get rid of the fuperfluous hemistich.

MUSGRAVE.

O, ten times more,-than tigers of Hyrcania.5
See, ruthless queen, a hapless father's tears:
This cloth thou dipp'dft in blood of my sweet boy,
And I with tears do wafh the blood away.
Keep thou the napkin, and go boast of this:

[He gives back the Handkerchief.

And, if thou tell'ft the heavy ftory right,
Upon my foul, the hearers will shed tears;
Yea, even my foes will shed faft-falling tears,
And fay,-Alas, it was a piteous deed!--
There, take the crown, and, with the crown, my
curfe ;7

And, in thy need, fuch comfort come to thee,
As now I reap at thy too cruel hand!—

Hard-hearted Clifford, take me from the world;
My foul to heaven, my blood upon your heads!
NORTH. Had he been flaughter-man to all my

kin,

I fhould not for my life but weep with him, To see how inly forrow gripes his foul.8

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of Hyrcania.] So the folio. The quartos read-of

Arcadia. STEEVENS.

And, if thou tell ft the heavy story right,

Upon my foul, the hearers will shed tears.] So, in King Richard II:

"Tell thou the lamentable tale of me,

"And send the hearers weeping to their beds."

STEEVENS.

7 There, take the crown, and, with the crown, my curse ;] Rowe has transferred this execration to his dying Hengift in The Royal Convert:

wear my crown ;

"Take it, and be as curs'd with it as I was."

STEEVENS.

8 I fhould not for my life but weep with him, To fee how inly forrow gripes his foul.] So the folio, The quartos as follows:

"I could not choose but weep with him, to fee
"How inward anger gripes his heart." STEEVENS.

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Q. MAR. What, weeping-ripe, my lord Northumberland?

Think but upon the wrong he did us all,

And that will quickly dry thy melting tears.
CLIF. Here's for my oath, here's for my father's

death.

[Stabbing him. Q. MAR. And here's to right our gentle-hearted

king.9

[Stabbing him. YORK. Open thy gate of mercy, gracious God! • My foul flies through these wounds to feek out

thee.

[Dies. Q. MAR. Off with his head, and fet it on York

gates;

So York may overlook the town of York.'

[Exeunt.

And here's to right our gentle-hearted king.] So the folio. The quarto thus:

"And there's to right our gentle harted kind."

Of thefe variations there are many, but it is useless labour to enumerate them all. STEEVENS.

1

So York may overlook &c.] This gallant nobleman fell by his own imprudence, in confequence of leading an army of only five thousand men to engage with twenty thousand, and not waiting for the arrival of his fon the Earl of March, with a large body of Welshmen. He and Cicely his wife, with his fon Edmond Earl of Rutland, were originally buried in the chancel of Foderingay church; and (as Peacham informs us in his Complete Gentleman, 4to. 1627,) "when the chancel in that furie of knocking churches and facred monuments in the head, was also felled to the ground," they were removed into the churchyard; and afterwards" lapped in lead they were buried in the church by the commandment of Queen Elizabeth; and a mean monument of plaifter wrought with the trowel erected over them, very homely, and far unfitting so noble princes."

"I remember, (adds the fame writer,) Mafter Creufe, a gentleman and my worthy friend, who dwelt in the college at the fame time, told me, that their coffins being opened, their bodies appeared very plainly to be discerned, and withal that the dutchefs

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