A Pictorial History of Greece: Ancient and Modern

B́a trước
Huntington & Savage, 1849 - 370 trang
0 Bài đánh giá
Google không xác minh bài đánh giá nhưng có kiểm tra để t́m nội dung giả và xoá nội dung đó khi t́m thấy
 

Nội dung mọi người đang nói đến - Viết bài đánh giá

Chúng tôi không t́m thấy bài đánh giá nào ở các vị trí thông thường.

Nội dung

Ấn bản in khác - Xem tất cả

Thuật ngữ và cụm từ thông dụng

Đoạn trích phổ biến

Trang 367 - They fought like brave men, long and well; They piled that ground with Moslem slain; They conquered — but Bozzaris fell, Bleeding at every vein. His few surviving comrades saw His smile when rang their proud hurrah, And the red field was won; Then saw in death his eyelids close Calmly, as to a night's repose, Like flowers at set of sun.
Trang 70 - THOU, of all creation blest, Sweet insect ! that delight'st to rest Upon the wild wood's leafy tops, To drink the dew that morning drops, And chirp thy song with such a glee, That happiest kings may envy thee ! Whatever decks the velvet field, Whate'er the circling seasons yield, Whatever buds, whatever blows, For thee it buds, for thee it grows. Nor yet art thou the peasant's fear, To him thy friendly notes are dear ; For...
Trang 55 - Of sounding brass ; the polish'd axle, steel. Eight brazen spokes in radiant order flame; The circles gold, of uncorrupted frame, Such as the heavens produce : and round the gold Two brazen rings of work divine were roll'd. The bossy naves of solid silver shone; Braces of gold suspend the moving throne : The car, behind, an arching figure bore ; The bending concave form'd an arch before. Silver the beam, the' extended yoke was gold, And golden reins the
Trang 283 - Know that a son is born to us. We thank the gods, not so much for their gift, as for bestowing it at a time when Aristotle lives. We -assure ourselves that you will form him a prince, worthy of his father, and worthy of Macedon'.
Trang 77 - There is a Power whose care Teaches thy way along the pathless coast, — The desert and illimitable air, — Lone wandering, but not lost.
Trang 355 - Being presented at a feast with a large goblet of wine, he threw it upon the ground. When blamed for wasting so much good liquor, he answered, " Had I drunk it, there would have been double waste ; I as well as the wine would have been lost.
Trang 239 - Socrates was to drink the poison. His family and friends assembled early, to spend the last hours with him. Xanthippe, his wife, was much affected, and showed her grief by loud cries. Socrates made a sign to Crito to have her removed, as he wished to spend his last moments in tranquillity. He then talked with his friends first about his poem, then concerning suicide, and lastly concerning the immortality of the soul.
Trang 70 - Whatever decks the velvet field, Whate'er the circling seasons yield, Whatever buds, whatever blows, For thee it buds, for thee it grows. Nor yet art thou the peasant's fear, To him thy friendly notes are dear ; For thou art mild as matin dew...
Trang 46 - He, whose all-conscious eyes the world behold, The eternal Thunderer sat, enthroned in gold. High heaven the footstool of his feet he makes, And wide beneath him all Olympus shakes.
Trang 81 - When from the mountain tops, with hideous cry, And clattering wings the hungry Harpies fly: They snatch the meat, defiling all they find, And, parting, leave a loathsome stench behind.

Thông tin thư mục