Cumberland's British Theatre: With Remarks, Biographical & Critical. Printed from the Acting Copies, as Performed at the Theatres Royal, London...

B́a trước
J. Cumberland, 1828
0 Bài đánh giá
Google không xác minh bài đánh giá nhưng có kiểm tra để t́m nội dung giả và xoá nội dung đó khi t́m thấy
 

Nội dung mọi người đang nói đến - Viết bài đánh giá

Chúng tôi không t́m thấy bài đánh giá nào ở các vị trí thông thường.

Các trang được chọn

Thuật ngữ và cụm từ thông dụng

Đoạn trích phổ biến

Trang 24 - Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain, As in revenge, have suck'd up from the sea Contagious fogs ; which falling in the land Have every pelting river made so proud That they have overborne their continents : The ox hath therefore stretch'd his yoke in vain, The ploughman lost his sweat, and the green corn Hath rotted ere his youth attain'da beard ; The fold stands empty in the drowned field, And crows are fatted with the murrain flock...
Trang 42 - So we grew together, Like to a double cherry, seeming parted ; But yet a union in partition, Two lovely berries moulded on one stem : So, with two seeming bodies, but one heart ; Two of the first, like coats in heraldry, Due but to one, and crowned with one crest.
Trang 56 - Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name. Such tricks hath strong imagination, That, if it would but apprehend some joy, It comprehends some bringer of that joy ; Or, in the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush suppos'da bear ! Hip.
Trang 15 - Thrice blessed they, that master so their blood, To undergo such maiden pilgrimage : But earthlier happy is the rose distill'd, Than that which, withering on the virgin thorn, Grows, lives, and dies, in single blessedness.
Trang 18 - Things base and vile, holding no quantity, Love can transpose to form and dignity : Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind ; And therefore is wing'd Cupid painted blind...
Trang 65 - Now the hungry lion roars, And the wolf behowls the moon ; Whilst the heavy ploughman snores, All with weary task fordone. Now the wasted brands do glow, Whilst the screech-owl, screeching loud, Puts the wretch that lies in woe In remembrance of a shroud.
Trang 25 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid, on a dolphin's back, Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song ; And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Trang 27 - I know a bank whereon the wild thyme blows, Where ox-lips and the nodding violet grows ; Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine. With sweet musk-roses, and with eglantine...
Trang 56 - Lovers, and madmen, have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, Are of imagination all compact :< One sees more devils than vast hell can hold ; That is, the madman : the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt...
Trang 42 - All school-days' friendship, childhood innocence ? We, Hermia, like two artificial gods, Have with our needles created both one flower, Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key ; As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds, Had been incorporate.

Thông tin thư mục