H́nh ảnh trang
PDF
ePub

CONTENTS.

Preface to this Edition

Introduction

General Principles of Education
Truth and Sincerity

Authority and Obedience

Rewards and Punishments

Temper

Justice

Harmony, Generosity, &c.

Fearfulness and Fortitude

Independence

Industry, Perseverance and Attention

Vanity and Affectation

Delicacy

Manners and Order

Religious Instruction

Religious Habits

Conclusion

Appendix

[ocr errors]

PAGE.

6

7

12

15

25

37

48

55

58

67

87

93

107

113

119

127

142

159

162

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

PREFACE ΤΟ THIS EDITION.

$

*4x4

£3

"

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

The "Hints for the Improvement of Early Education and Nursery Discipline," were published in London, without the name of the author. They are said to have been written by a sister of Mrs. Fry, the female philanthropist, and were sent to the Editor of the present Edition, by the Hon. T. Babbington, Member of the British Parliament, and Author of a valuable work entitled, a PRACTICAL VIEW OF CHRISTIAN

EDUCATION.

By the solicitation of several inteligent Mother's, who have supposed, that the perusal of the "Hints" has aided them in the government and education of their children, this little volume is now republished for the purpose of adapting it to the use ofAmerican Mothers generally. A few sentences have been omitted, a few corrected, and several original notes inserted, all which it is believed, the Author will approve.

Ever since 1781, when Mr. Raikes, in conjunction with Rev. Mr. Stock, demonstrated the practicability and usefulness of Sabbath Schools, the interests of early education seem to have been rapidly advancing. The impulse then given to the intellectual and moral improvement of children, has been productive of the happiest results. Mothers now feel, that the instruction of those committed to their care must be early begun at home. The Infant school is next opened for them, and through the combined influence of Mothers and Infant Schools, the little beings collect and ar

range an extensive store of useful information, during those years in which they were formerly deemed incapable of effi cient education. Many useful Treatises also, on education in this period of life, have been published, both in England and America. Among those of our own country, "The Mother at Home," by Rev. J. S. C. Abbott, and the "Infant School Manual," by Mrs. Howland, are pre-eminent. The "Mother's Magazine," by Mrs. Whittlesey, is exciting a deeper interest in the welfare of young children, and wisely directing it to happy effects. Maternal associations also, are producing great good, and when one in every village in our land shall be well attended, and conducted on the strict principles of the original society at Portland, we shall see blessed effects on the rising generation.

From the high regard in which the "Hints" for the improvement of early Education are held in the land of our fathers, and the numerous editions through which they have passed, it is believed, that the "MOTHER'S MANUAL" will not fail to give essential aid to those Mothers, who desire to "train up their children in the way they should go."

AMERICAN EDITOR.

[ocr errors]

INTRODUCTION.

It is with considerable diffidence, that the Writer offers to the attention of Mothers, and those engaged in the care and instruction of young children, the following Remarks; though she hopes that their being the simple result of experience will compensate for their imperfections.

The origin of this little work was as follows. The Author having formed a few rules, as directions for her nurse-maid, in the management of her first child, committed them to paper, that they might be more clearly understood and remembered; and as she found these written rules beneficial in her own nursery, she conceived they might prove useful to others. Whilst attempting, however, to improve and enlarge them, she was persuaded they touched upon so many important points; they were so closely interwoven with the first principles of education; that they could not, with propriety, be addressed to those whose duty is more to obey than to rule and that they were most likely to be useful, as an assistance to a mother, in the exercise of her

« TrướcTiếp tục »