Introduction to Shakespeare's Plays, Containing an Essay on Oratory

B́a trước
John Bell; and C. Etherington, at York, 1773 - 57 trang
0 Bài đánh giá
Google không xác minh bài đánh giá nhưng có kiểm tra để t́m nội dung giả và xoá nội dung đó khi t́m thấy
 

Nội dung mọi người đang nói đến - Viết bài đánh giá

Chúng tôi không t́m thấy bài đánh giá nào ở các vị trí thông thường.

Các trang được chọn

Ấn bản in khác - Xem tất cả

Thuật ngữ và cụm từ thông dụng

Đoạn trích phổ biến

Trang 41 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee: — I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not , fatal vision , sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
Trang 45 - How that might change his nature, there's the question: It is the bright day that brings forth the adder; And that craves wary walking. Crown him? — that? And then, I grant, we put a sting in him, That at his will he may do danger with.
Trang 48 - ... creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the Lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress
Trang 41 - Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses, Or else worth all the rest ; I see thee still, And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood, Which was not so before.
Trang 35 - Farewell the tranquil mind ! Farewell content ! Farewell the plumed troop, and the big wars, That make ambition virtue ! O, farewell ! Farewell the neighing steed, and the shrill trump, The spirit-stirring drum, the ear-piercing fife, The royal banner ; and all quality. Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war ! And O, you mortal engines, whose rude throats The immortal Jove's dread clamours counterfeit, Farewell ! Othello's occupation's gone ! lago.
Trang 38 - O my soul's joy ! If after every tempest come such calms, May the winds blow till they have waken'd death ! And let the labouring bark climb hills of seas, Olympus-high ; and duck again as low As hell's from heaven ! If it were now to die, 'Twere now to be most happy ; for, I fear, My soul hath her content so absolute, That not another comfort like to this Succeeds in unknown fate.
Trang 30 - He is the Rock, his work is perfect : for all his ways are judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right is he.
Trang 40 - Which reason, joining or disjoining, frames All what we' affirm or what deny, and call Our knowledge or opinion ; then retires Into her private cell, when nature rests. Oft in her absence mimic fancy wakes To imitate her; but, misjoining shapes, Wild work produces oft, and most in dreams ; 111 matching words and deeds long past or late.
Trang 30 - For the Lord's portion is his people ; Jacob is the lot of his inheritance. He found him in a desert land, and in the waste howling wilderness; he led him about, he instructed him, he kept him as the apple of his eye.
Trang 45 - Tis a confummation Devoutly to be wifh'd. To die — to fleep — To fleep ' perchance to dream ? ay, there's the rub ; For in that fleep of death what dreams may come, When we have fhuffied off this mortal coil, Muft give us paufe.

Thông tin thư mục