Abridgement of Mental Philosophy: Including the Three Departments of the Intellect, Sensibilities, and Will ; Designed as a Text-book for Academies and High Schools

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Harper & Brothers, 1864 - 564 trang
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Relation between the sensation and what is outwardly signified Pago 38 ib 40 41 42 44 15
32
Of the organ of sight and the uses or benefits of that senso
33
Statement of the mode or process in visual perception
34
Of the original and acquired perceptions of sight
35
Varieties of the sensation of sound
36
Of the knowledge of the figure of bodies by the sight
37
Illustration of the subject from the blind
38
Measurements of magnitude by the
39
Of objects seen in a mist
40
Of the sun and moon when seen in the horizon
41
Or the estimation of distances by sight
42
Signs by means of which we estimate distance by sight
43
Estimation of distance when unaided by intermediate objects
44
Of objects seen on the ocean
46
ib 54
55
56
57
CHAPTER VII
58
Of habit in relation to the smell
59
Of habit in relation to the taste
60
Of habit in relation to the hearing
62
Application of habit to the touch
64
Oiher striking instances of habits of touch
65
Habits considered in relation to the sight
66
Sensations may possess a relative as well as positive increase of power
68
Of habits as modified by particular callings and arts
69
The law of habit considered in reference to the perceptior of the outlines and forms of objects
70
Notice of some facts which favour the above doctrine
71
Additional illustrations of Mr Stewarts doctrine
72
60 62 64 65 GO 68 69 70 71 72 CHAPTER VIII
73
Of conceptions of objects of sight
74
Of the influence of habit on our conceptions
76
Influence of habit on conceptions of sight 63 Of the subserviency of our conceptions to description
77
Of conceptions attended with a momentary belief
78
Conceptions which are joined with perceptions
81
Conceptions as connected with fictitious representations
82
SIMPLICITY AND COMPLEXNESS OF MENTAL STATES
83
Manner in which we learn the place of sounds
85
73
88
74
89
76
91
77
92
General abstract notions the same with genera and species
95
CHAPTER XI
101
The beginning of kr owledge is in the senses
104
There may also be internal accessions to knowledge
105
Instances of notions which have an internal origin
106
CHAPTER XII
107
Impoit of suggestion and its application in Reid and Stewart
108
Ideas of existence mind selfexistence and personal identity
109
Of the nature of inity and the origin of that notion
110
Ill Nature of succession and origin of the idea of succession 112 Origin of the notion of duration
112
Of our estimate of time in dreaming
113
Of time and its measurements and of eternity
114
The idea of space not of external origin
115
The idea of space has its origin in suggestion
116
Of the origin of the idea of power
117
Occasions of the origin of the idea of power
118
Of the ideas of right and wrong
119
Origin of the ideas of moral merit and demerit
120
Of other elements of knowledge developed in suggestion
121
Suggestion a source of principles as well as of ideas
122
123
124
128
128
135
135
CHAPTER III
136
Further remarks on the proper objects of consciousness
137
Consciousnes a ground or law of belief 138 126 Instances of knowledge developed in consciousness
138
CHAPTER IV
140
Occasions on which feelings of relation may arise
141
Of the use of correlative termo 130 Of relations of identity and diversity
142
11 Relations of degree and names expressive of them
143
111 Of relations of proportion
144
IV Of relations of place or position
145
v of relations of time
146
v1 of ideas of possession
147
VI Of relations of cause and effect
148
Of complex terms involving the relation of cause and effect
149
Connexion of relative suggestion with reasoning
150
ib 143 144 145
151
Of the general laws of association
152
Resemblance the first general law of association
153
Of resemblance in the effects produced
154
Contrast the second general or primary
155
Contiguity the third general or primary
157
Canise and effect the fourth primary
158
151
163
CHAPTER VII
166
Illustrations of philosophic memory
172
Further directions for the improvement of the memory
179
Approval and illustrations of these views from Colerid je
185
Use of definitions and axioms in demonstrative ressening
186
The opposites of demonstrative reasonings absurd
187
Demonstrations do not admit of different degrees of belief
188
Of the use of liagrams in demonstrations
189
190
190
Definition of reasoning and of propositions
191
200
200
Pne
201
202
202
203
203
204
204
205
205
CHAPTER XI
206
Of the nature of moral certainty
207
Of reasoning from analogy
208
Of reasoning by induction
209
Of combined or accumulated arguments 208 209
210
CHAPTER XII
211
Care to be used in correctly stating the subject of discussion
212
Consider the kind of evidence applicable to the subject 213 199 Reject the aid of false arguments or sophisms
213
Fallacia equivocationis or the use of equivocal terms and phrases
215
Of the sophism of estimating actions and character from the cir cumstances of success merely
216
Of adherence to our opinions
217
Effects on the mind of debating for victory instead of truth
218
CHAPTER XIII
219
The imagination closely related to the reasoning power
220
Definition of the power of imagination
221
Process of the mind in the creations of the imagination
222
Further remarks on the same subject 209 Illustration from the writings of Dr Reid
223
Grounds of the preference of one conception to another
224
Illustration of the subject from Milton 212 The creations of imagination not entirely voluntary
225
Illustration of the statements of the preceding section
227
On the utility of the faculty of the imagination
228
Importance of the imagination in connexion with reasoning
229
CHAPTER XIV
231
Of excited conceptions and of apparitions in general 218 Of the less permanent excited conceptions of sight
232
Of the less permament excited conceptions of sound 220 First cause of permanently vivid conceptions or apparitions Morbid sensibility of the retina ...
235
Methods of relief adopted in this case
239
Of disordered or alienated sensations
245
231
248
232
249
Illustrations of this mental disorder
251
Characteristics of emotions of beauty
252
DIVISION I I
259
Classification of the natural sensibilities
265
Of what is meant by beautiful objects
274
Original or intrinsic beauty The circle
280
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
286
Explanation of the beauty of motion from Kaimes
292
Jortion
295
The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of human
298
Of colours in connexion with the sublime
304
General nature of emot ons of the ludicrous
310
CLASS I
318
acts
321
304
323
Desires always imply an object desired
324
Of the natural desile of esteem
328
Instances of instincts in the human mind
330
1
333
Of the moral character of the desire of power
335
CHAPTER IV
336
Relation of the social principle to civil society
341
Of voluntary in distinction from instinctive resentment
347
Modifications of resentment Revenge
353
Practical resills of he principle of imitation
355
Sectior
359
CHAPTER VI
371
Illustrations of the filial affection
377
Of patriotism or love of country
389
Man created originally with the principle of love to
395
Further illustrations of the results of the absence of this principle
401
Of the origin of secondary active principles
408
M
409
Classification of the moral sensibilities
414
Page
419
Of the close connexion between conscience and reasoning
420
Further proof from language and literature
426
Disordered action of the principle of selfpreservation
428
C
433
Further illustrations of the influence of wrong speculative npin
439
Of the discouragements attending a process of moral instruction
445
CHAPTER I
451
Disordered and alienated action of the possessory principle
455
Of sympathetic imitation and what is involved in
461
The notion which men naturally form of the Deity implies
462
Of sudden and strong impulses of the mind
467
Disordered action of the passion of fear
473
Moral accountability in cases of natural moral derangement
479
451
483
It exists in reference to what we believe to be in our power
485
Remarks of Hooker on the universality of
491
The foreknowledge of events implies the foreknowledge of
494
Other familiar instances of this foresight
500
Circumstances under which freedom of the will exists
506
Without the possession of liberty of will man could never have
512
The doctrine of the wills freedom equally important with that
518
Illustrated from the prosecution of some general plan
524
INTELLECTUAL STATES OF INTERNAL ORIGIN
3
235
b 308 309
311 ib 313 313 314

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Trang 78 - Spit, fire! spout, rain! Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire, are my daughters: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; I never gave you kingdom, call'd you children, You owe me no subscription: then let fall Your horrible pleasure; here I stand, your slave, A poor, infirm, weak, and despis'd old man.
Trang 303 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Trang 390 - Lands intersected by a narrow frith Abhor each other. Mountains interposed Make enemies of nations, who had else Like kindred drops been mingled into one.
Trang 101 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Trang 306 - AND I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud : and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire...
Trang 491 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Trang 302 - There went up a smoke out of his nostrils, and fire out of his mouth devoured : coals were kindled by it. He bowed the heavens also, and came down : and darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly : yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind. He made darkness his secret place ; his pavilion round about him were dark waters and thick clouds of the skies.
Trang 240 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind; a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
Trang 180 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise ! * Each stamps its image as the other flies.
Trang 310 - The sun had long since in the lap Of Thetis taken out his nap, And like a lobster boiled, the morn From black to red began to turn," The imagination modifies images, and gives unity to variety ; it sees all things in one, il piti nelV uno.

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