Vietnam: State, War, and Revolution (1945–1946)

B́a trước
University of California Press, 15 thg 4, 2013 - 721 trang
Amidst the revolutionary euphoria of August 1945, most Vietnamese believed that colonialism and war were being left behind in favor of independence and modernization. The late-September British-French coup de force in Saigon cast a pall over such assumptions. Ho Chi Minh tried to negotiate a mutually advantageous relationship with France, but meanwhile told his lieutenants to plan for a war in which the nascent state might have to survive without allies. In this landmark study, David Marr evokes the uncertainty and contingency as well as coherence and momentum of fast-paced events. Mining recently accessible sources in Aix-en-Provence and Hanoi, Marr explains what became the largest, most intense mobilization of human resources ever seen in Vietnam.
 

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Nội dung

Introduction
1
Forming the DRV Government
19
The Government at Work
57
Defense
111
Peace or War?
183
Seeking Foreign Friends
258
Material Dreams and Realities
315
Dealing with Domestic Opposition
383
The Indochinese Communist Party and the Vidt Minh
442
Mass Mobilization
499
Epilogue
569
Notes
579
Sources
689
Index
701
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Thuật ngữ và cụm từ thông dụng

Giới thiệu về tác giả (2013)

David Marr is Emeritus Professor of History at Australian National University and the author of Vietnamese Anticolonialism, 1885-1925 (1971), Vietnamese Tradition on Trial, 1920-1945 (1981), and Vietnam 1945: The Quest for Power (1995), all published with University of California Press.

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